Avery Dennison RBIS Blog

#techstyle: The Future of Fashion

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, displays digital revolution

A purse that charges your phone; a dress that moves with you, and one with wings. In 2016, fashion and technology have never been more connected.

Showcasing works by 30 emerging and established designers, #techstyle, the current exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA), Boston, displays the narrowing gap between what we wear and how we live.

The exhibit opens to an introduction of #techstyle, a fashion revolution, and notable industry pioneers’ works, including the late Alexander McQueen and Rei Kawakubo, before splitting into theProduction and Performance wings.

“We’re trying to present both the present and future of fashion,” said Michelle Finamore, a curator at the MFA, in a New York Times article. “These new technologies are having an effect not only on the way designers design, but also on the way we interact with our garments.”

The Production wing showed how new technologies influence garment production, with a heavy focus on 3D printing and plugging your device into your outfit.

Avery Dennison RBIS’ brand partner Mary Katrantzou’s Expandit dress lit up a corner of the space. Made of printed silk twill embroidered with beads, the Expandit dress is a dive into digital printing, designed on the computer with Katrantzou’s custom layout builds that work to fit the garment.

An iconic piece from the collection, Iris van Herpen’s and Neri Oxman’s Anthozoa 3D-print cape and skirt is a first made from both hard and soft materials, with a nature-inspired look created from the most advanced printing technology.

“We’re trying to present both the present and future of fashion,” said Michelle Finamore, a curator at the MFA. “These new technologies are having an effect not only on the way designers design, but also on the way we interact with our garments.”
 Iris van Herpen’s and Neri Oxman’s Anthozoa 3D-print cape and skirt

And the exhibit showcases the intersection between fashion and sustainability, which aligns with some of our key priorities at RBIS. G-Star’s RAW for the Oceans dives into the issue of ocean plastic,  developing technology that recycles waste into usable clothing - both outfitting the consumer and saving resources. In collaboration with Pharrell Williams and Bionic Yarn, this line features denim clothing woven with yarns made from plastic bottles found in the ocean.

The Performance wing housed one-of-a-kind garments. Made from stretched high-heat plastics, with heat-sensitive inks, or from robotics, these pieces are true works of art.

And when will an LED-powered dress that reacts with your electronics be on the racks? 

Only time will tell.

Learn more about how RBIS is innovating in the space.
Contact one of our Customer Design and Innovation Centers
in New York or Los Angeles.
800-543-6650, prompt 5

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